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Courses

Title Duration CME Certified
1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Treatment for HIV/AIDS has significantly improved over the last few decades and has reduced morbidity and mortality rates in patients living with HIV/AIDS. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) slows the progression of the disease by reducing the amount of HIV in the blood. Determining the most effective treatment regimen is a complex process and will require the use of several medications. The goal of this course is to provide pharmacists in acute care settings with an overview of HIV medication classes and factors influencing treatment decisions.

Discuss the different classes of antiretroviral drugs used for the treatment of HIV.

Explain the guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral therapy, its use in pre-exposure prophylaxis, and its implication for opportunistic infections.

Instructor
Robert Smith, PharmD

1.25

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Learning about the feelings and thoughts that accompany grief can lessen your fear and anxiety surrounding it. In this course, you will learn a basic understanding of the grief process, the different types of grief, and ways of expressing it. You will learn about the gifts of grief and that it is an agent of change. Finally, you will also learn some tools to help you stay present and resilient as a healthcare professional journeying with clients and families.

Apply at least two grief models to client circumstances.

Define three types of grief and their contexts.

Recognize two gifts of grief that apply to the general population.

Learn at least two ways to stay resilient in professional practice.

Instructor
Heidi Gessner

Staff Writer
Susan Heinzerling, BSN, RN, CHPN

 

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (2021), an estimated 37 million people in the U.S. are currently living with renal disease. It ranks among the top causes of death. Often caused by hypertension or diabetes, chronic kidney disease, which is the most prevalent type of kidney disease, is treatable with medication and lifestyle modification. Unfortunately, an estimated 90% of people with chronic kidney disease do not know they have it and therefore do not receive the necessary care to prolong or improve their quality of life. When you understand the underlying risk factors, you can better recognize symptoms, educate, treat, and prevent further kidney damage. This course discusses the pathophysiology of renal disease. It also discusses a nurse’s role in assessing, managing, and educating people with a diagnosis of renal disease.

Describe the pathophysiology of renal disease.

Discuss the nurse's role in assessing, managing, and educating individuals with renal disease.

Staff Writer
Annette Brownlee BSN, RN

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

As the number of older adults increases, especially those who are older and frailer, the incidence of elder abuse is expected to increase. Mistreatment of older adults often occurs in isolation and often remains undetected. The first step to addressing the problem is to heighten awareness of abuse of the old, in particular among those who serve them or have frequent contact with them. Throughout this course, you will learn about types of elder abuse, indicators, consequences, risk factors of abuse, and interventions. You will have the opportunity to test what you have learned in each section through brief quizzes. The course also offers typical elder abuse case scenarios drawn from actual case material from Adult Protective Services or other elder abuse program caseloads.

Describe the nature, scope, and severity of elder abuse.

Identify the types of abuse suffered by older adults.

Identify indicators of abuse for older adults.

Identify options for screening older adults for abuse.

Recall intervention options for victims and abusers.

Staff Writer
Kimberly Cobb, M.S.

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Polypharmacy is a widespread problem in older adults as a direct result of chronic conditions requiring an individual to take five or more daily medications. It often leads to adverse drug events that can range from mild to severe or even death. This course discusses polypharmacy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. It also discusses basic medication actions and interactions with a focus on the physiological changes and potential reactions seen in older adults. Understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of how medications work on and within the body is important in preventing adverse drug events from polypharmacy.

Identify three classifications of medications.

Discuss pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and their relationship to medication toxicity in older adults.

Explain why polypharmacy increases the potential for adverse drug events and who is at risk.

Staff Writer
Kathleen Koopmann, RN, BSN, PCCN

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

Understanding the risks for and motivations behind active shooter events, how your body and mind may respond to stress, and how best to prepare for an active shooter event is the best way to protect yourself and others, should the unthinkable occur in your facility.

The goal of this course is to educate healthcare professionals in all settings about specific actions for assessing the risks for, preventing, and responding to an active shooter event.

Review definitions, statistics, and trends of active shooter events.

Explain the natural responses of the human body when exposed to danger.

Evaluate and discuss ways in which training and preparation can be incorporated into institution protocols.

Instructor
Ashley M. Coffey, RN

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

In patients with symptoms of stroke, early recognition and intervention have been identified as critical factors in stroke outcomes. This includes an initial assessment, a thorough neurological exam, and stabilization of hemodynamic changes. In addition, distinguishing ischemic from hemorrhagic strokes requires time-sensitive assessment parameters, interventions, and diagnostic procedures. Timely diagnoses allow the healthcare team to administer the appropriate treatment options accurately and effectively.

Describe the physiologic and symptomatic differences in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

Discuss assessment tools, management strategies, and complications related to acute stroke.

Staff Writer
Zeliha Ozen, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNL

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

In patients recovering from a stroke, post-hospital care and interventions have been identified as critical factors in favorable stroke outcomes. Improving patient care by managing stroke complications can significantly improve recovery. Given this, nurses and physicians must understand the different types of stroke complications, appropriate interventions, and identify risk factors for recurrent stroke.

Describe two interventions to decrease the reoccurrence of a secondary stroke.

Identify complications and their appropriate interventions after a stroke.

Describe two-stroke risk factors.

Staff Writer
Zeliha Ozen, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNL

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

In patients with symptoms of acute stroke, early recognition and interventions have been identified as critical factors in stroke outcomes. Evidence-based care can identify, manage, and prevent stroke-related complications. Nurses and physicians must understand stroke management to prevent disability and death. This course aims to present the most up-to-date practices for managing patients with acute stroke.

Discuss current diagnostic practices in patients with acute stroke.

Recall best practice protocols for early identification of acute stroke.

Staff Writer
Zeliha Ozen, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNL

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a tool used to measure the severity of stroke symptoms and aid in identifying the location of the injury. The NIHSS has been shown to strongly predict the likelihood of a patient’s recovery after stroke. 

The goal of this course is to equip clinicians with the knowledge necessary to apply the NIHSS to patients experiencing an acute stroke.

State the primary purpose of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS).

List all NIHSS items and areas of assessment that are used to test for stroke severity.

Calculate NIHSS scores that correspond to levels of stroke severity.

Instructor
Cathryn Ayers, RN

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Rates of suicide among youth continue to increase, making it essential for behavioral health clinicians and other professionals working with adolescents and transition-age youth to understand the dynamics of suicide among young people. After providing a foundation on how widespread the problem is and the prevailing theories about the drivers of suicidal behaviors, this course will teach you about how to effectively screen potentially suicidal youth and ways you can intervene to lower their risk. The goal of this course is to provide alcohol and drug counseling, behavioral counseling, marriage and family therapy, nursing, psychology, and social work professionals in health and human services settings with skills for reducing suicide risk in adolescents and transition-age youth.

State 3 primary assessment strategies you can use to identify youth who are at risk for suicide.

Describe interventions that can effectively reduce the risk of suicide in adolescents and transition age youth.

Explain the primary drivers of suicide according to Joiner’s interpersonal theory and how they operate to increase risk.

Summarize the impact of risk and protective factors for adolescents and transition-age youth.

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Obesity affects the entire scope of a person‘s life, including health, social relationships, self-image, and psychological well-being. Now recognizing obesity as a chronic disease that must be managed long term, the American Medical Association has added a new sub specialty to its continuum of care: the obesity medicine physician. As the number of obese people in our society rises, the health care industry must assimilate this aspect of their treatment and care into daily practice. This module discusses the epidemic that obesity has become, reviews current treatments and care plans, and includes the psychosocial impact that being obese has upon the individual and society.

Describe six major contributing factors for obesity in adults.

Discuss patient education on the benefits and adverse effects of three prescription medications for obesity.

Explain the differences between four surgical approaches to the management of obesity.

Instructor
Cathy S. Birn, MA, RN, CGRN, CNOR

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

This course provides an overview of essential skills and considerations for engaging in sensitive and effective advance care planning conversations. You will learn the most important decision domains to address as outlined in the FIVE WISHES® framework, how to demonstrate compassionate communication, and conversation skills specific to eliciting values-based end-of-life care decisions.

The goal of this course is to provide healthcare professionals in all settings with enhanced communication skills related to advance care planning.

Identify the five most important decision domains to discuss with people during advance care planning conversations as outlined in the Five Wishes conversation framework.

Define the benefits of compassionate communication and identify the skills involved.

Define and apply specific skills necessary for conducting effective and sensitive advance care planning conversations.

Identify general considerations to keep in mind when conducting advance care planning conversations.

Instructor
Kathleen Taylor, MA, LMHC

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

This course will help you determine the steps you need to take to build and implement an effective advance care planning program and describe how resources from the FIVE WISHES framework program can help. You will learn how to build support, determine goals and measures, and identify processes and standards to ensure your program is making a difference for your care recipients and your healthcare organization.

Describe the basic components of advance care planning and the benefits for care recipients and healthcare providers.

Define meaningful goals, measures, and processes for an advance care planning program.

Describe education and training options for training clinicians to facilitate advance care planning conversations.

Identify standards of practice for an advance care planning program.

Discuss the importance of community engagement as part of an advance care planning program.

Instructor
Kathleen Taylor

0.50

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Advance directives are legal documents with instructions that apply if an adult is not able to make decisions about their own healthcare. They are meant to ensure that a person’s values related to dying, quality of life, and other relevant considerations are honored. It’s important for everyone to have a basic understanding of what advance directives are and when they are applied so personal wishes can be observed at the end of life.

Identify the most common types of advance directives and find out if a person has made them.

Explain how advance directives can improve quality of life even at the end of life.

Anticipate cultural and other issues that can impact end of life planning.

Instructor
Kelly J. Ace, Ph.D.

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Despite intensive efforts to motivate patients and families to formulate advance directives (ADs), most Americans do not have them and may face a life-threatening illness without a plan to guide their relatives and healthcare providers. Experts stress the need for major changes in the approach to promoting ADs, including a focus on ongoing dialogue between patients and healthcare providers. This course outlines what happens in the absence of an advance directive and identifies how to overcome barriers to implementation. As a clinician, you will learn new ways to involve patients in advance-care planning.

Identify barriers that patients, families and healthcare professionals face in implementing Advance Directives

Describe problems created by lack of an Advance Directive

Describe new ways that healthcare professionals can involve patients in advance care planning

Instructor
Maureen Habel, MA, RN  

Dawn Demangone-Yoon, MD   

Shawnna Cannaday, MSN, RN, AGACNP, FNP-BC   

Theresa Pluth Yeo, RN, PhD, MSN, MPH, CRNP 

Expert Reviewer
Laur Pole, RN, MSN    

Christopher Pile, MD

1.25

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

All health centers funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) must have in place a system to improve patient care and outcomes, which is your center’s quality improvement (QI) program. While the primary benefit is improving patient care and outcomes, there are also financial benefits. The Department of Health and Human Services has allocated $36.3 million to fund centers that meet or exceed quality improvement measures. Although most health centers have established some QI functions, this course will enable you to take a comprehensive approach to implementing QI systems. You will learn about the essentials of QI infrastructure, systems, and programs, along with how to identify quality-related problems using proactive strategies, such as peer review and patient satisfaction surveys, as well as reactive strategies, such as patient complaint tracking systems. Also included is how to put the FOCUS-PDSA model into action.

Describe the elements of a successful quality improvement program.

Explain the 5 components of the quality improvement process.

Apply the Model for Improvement to put a quality improvement initiative into action.

Describe specific proactive and reactive quality improvement strategies for health centers.

Expert Reviewer
Jennifer Moore, RN-BC, DNS-CT, CDP

Expert Reviewer
Nellie Galindo, MSW, MSPH

Instructor
Katy Kunst, MBA

1.50

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The incorporation of screening for alcohol use disorders in a general medical setting can significantly increase the number of individuals with alcohol use disorders who are identified and treated. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved 4 medications to treat alcohol use disorder, making treatment in primary care and other general medical settings a viable alternative to specialty care. This course will give you valuable information about these medications as well as several medications used off-label, empowering those you serve and increasing the likelihood of their recovery.

Identify the benefits of treating alcohol use disorder in a medical setting.

Discuss the importance of screenings and brief interventions to treat individuals who have alcohol use disorder and identify common tools used for screenings.

Explain the steps involved in the treatment of alcohol use disorder.

Discuss the common medications used to treat alcohol use disorder.

Instructor
Dr. Alina Vrinceaunu-Hamm, MD

Staff Writer
Kimberly Cobb, M.S.

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) affects thousands of people each year. IPV affects people of all social and economic backgrounds, ages, sex, sexual orientation, race, and ethnicity. Those who experience IPV often suffer adverse social and health outcomes that make early recognition, identification, and response a priority for professionals working in healthcare and health and human services. The goal of this educational program is to provide nurses, psychologists, social workers, alcohol and drug counselors, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors in health and human services with information for recognizing, identifying, and responding to intimate partner violence.

Recall how to define an intimate partner and the types of intimate partner violence.

Identify five dynamics of survivors and perpetrators.

Recall four types of risk factors and at least five protective factors of IPV.

Describe five considerations for assessment and impacts of mandated reporting of IPV on survivors.

Describe eight considerations for treatment of IPV.

Staff Writer
Kimberly Cobb, MS

Instructor
Stephanie L. Furness-Kraft, LCSW, CCTP

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Substance use is a growing problem across populations. As a helping professional, you need a basic understanding of how substance use affects your clients. This information will help you to provide support and resources to help clients seek treatment and recovery. In this course, you will explore substance use disorders, how they develop, and their impact on individuals. The course also explains your role as a paraprofessional when working with individuals with substance use disorders. You will be provided an overview of evidence-based interventions and the types of substance use treatment programs available, when additional treatment may be necessary. Detailed examples will help you to apply this information in your own work. The goal of this course is to provide paraprofessionals and peer support specialists in health and human service settings with information on substance use disorders and evidence-based interventions.

Explain what a substance use disorder is, how it develops, and how it impacts individuals.

Identify strategies that paraprofessionals can use when working with individuals diagnosed with substance use disorders to encourage behavior change.

Describe the types of treatment that exist for people diagnosed with substance use disorders.

Instructor
Bryn Davis, M.Ed, LPC

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

There are external conditions which exist with the potential to affect a patient’s current and future health, often beyond a patient’s direct control. These conditions, referred to as social determinants of health, encompass where a patient lives and works, socioeconomic policies, systems, and norms, and more. These factors and many other contribute to health inequity and inequalities at local, state, national, and international levels. The social determinants of health impact the daily delivery, accessibility, and engagement of health improvement efforts. The conceptual framework behind social determinants of health, current inequalities and inequities in healthcare are important for clinicians to consider when while caring for patients and improving  the health of individuals and communities.   Clinicians must explore how to increase awareness and interest in the determinants, as well as ways to engage patients, stakeholders, and other clinicians in addressing social determinants of health.

Recognize how social determinants of health impact health inequities and inequalities.

Identify strategies to assess social determinants of health that may be affecting the patient population.

Recall the five domains of social determinants of health.

Instructor
Stephanie M. Smith MS, BSN, RN, CPN

1.75

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Data is being applied in ways never before seen by payers and providers to drive healthcare improvement through an analytic approach. Data can be applied to improve healthcare costs, quality, and outcomes. To understand how data is being utilized, you must first understand the broad perspective of what experts are calling the “data revolution” in healthcare, or the “age of big data.” It is also important to know what this means from a technology perspective.

There is also a micro-level of healthcare data application within the payer setting that has different ways in which data is helping payers to improve overall population health, manage healthcare costs, and inform the creation of innovative pilot programs. For those working in a healthcare setting, it is important to know how healthcare data is applied from a payer’s perspective. This includes member case management selection, the intersection of healthcare data and member preference, and how data is being used to inform best practices through medical necessity criteria (MNC) and clinical guidelines.

Discuss the background and implications of big data in healthcare.

Describe how data is utilized by case managers within different areas of the payer setting to improve care outcomes, measure case management performance, and identify fraud, waste, and abuse.

Explain how data drives better healthcare through evidence-based decision-making, application of medical necessity criteria, and utilization management.

Instructor
Wendy Waltrip, MSN, RN, CCM

Staff Writer
Alia Lutz, BSN, RN

2.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

The perioperative nurse plays a primary role in the operative process. Knowledge of procedures, appropriate patient assessment, and care management guidelines will positively impact patient outcomes. Patients consider anesthesia to be a major risk of surgery and expect perioperative team members to be their advocates by caring for their pre-, intra-, and post-operative needs and providing safe and effective care. This course discusses anesthetics and adjuvant medications used in the clinical setting, anesthesia-related complications, and the nurse’s role in management of perioperative patients.

Identify the stages and types of anesthesia, and medications commonly used in the perioperative setting.

Recognize important assessment areas for the post-anesthesia patient.

Describe complications of anesthesia and their treatments.

Instructor
Nicole Strickland, BA, BSN, RN, CPAN

1.75

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

HIPAA rules underlie every service related to behavioral health, and they change to meet evolving trends. There are potentially catastrophic organizational and individual consequences if the current HIPAA rules are not followed. This course will help you to identify potential legal and ethical issues related to HIPAA, improve your compliance approach, and develop more effective risk management strategies.

The goal of this course is to assist alcohol and drug counselors, marriage and family therapists, professional counselors, psychologists, social workers, and nurses in health and human services settings in understanding and applying current HIPAA regulations.

Indicate the purpose of HIPAA and how it applies to behavioral healthcare providers.

Recall at least three ways that the Privacy Rule impacts the day-to-day responsibilities of behavioral health providers.

Identify at least three steps that behavioral health providers need to take to ensure compliance with the Security Rule.

Instructor
Stephanie L. Furness-Kraft, LCSW, CCTP

2.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This course focuses specifically on early interventions that are designed to reduce suicide risk. You will learn how these early interventions impact suicide risk. You will also learn of examples and the role that programs highlighting connectedness, life skills, and resilience play in preventing suicide. The goal of this course is to provide social work, psychology, nursing, alcohol and drug counseling, marriage and family therapy, and counseling professionals in health and human services with information about community-based, upstream suicide prevention approaches. 

Explain what upstream suicide prevention means and why it is important.

Summarize the impact of connectedness as an upstream suicide prevention approach.

Describe how fostering life skills and resilience can help to prevent suicide.

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

Expert Reviewer
Kathryn Falbo-Woodson, MSW, LCSWA

1.75

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This course provides an overview of how anxiety impacts children and adolescents. You will learn about the specific types of anxiety disorders and the multiple pathways by which anxiety can develop. As you progress through this course, you will learn assessment strategies and evidence-based interventions that you can implement to identify and treat these disorders in children and adolescents.

Identify three common symptoms of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

Describe three of the possible origins of anxiety based on the research accumulated to date.

List assessment tools and practices to use when evaluating anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents.

Identify three evidence-based interventions for treating problematic anxiety in children and adolescents.

Instructor
Bridgett Ross, PsyD

Staff Writer
Pamela Green, LCSW RPT

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

In this course, you will learn to identify different depressive disorders, as well as the unique ways depression manifests in children and adolescents. Additionally, you will learn to recognize risk factors for both depression and suicidality in youth.  

An integrated care model treats the whole child by combining primary care and mental healthcare in one setting. Within this model, treatment providers understand how to screen for depression and suicidality in order to coordinate care. You will learn about specific instruments useful for detecting depression and suicidality among youth. An understanding of the root causes of depression will highlight the rationale for various treatment approaches. Lastly, you will be able to describe the best practices available to help children and adolescents manage depression.  

Identify three different types of depressive disorders and common symptoms of depression in children and adolescents.

Identify at least five causes and risk factors of clinical depression and how to screen for depressive disorders in children and adolescents.

Describe three interventions to treat child and adolescent depressive disorders.

Staff Writer
Pamela Green, LCSW RPT

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Opioids are used to treat severe pain but also include serious risks if the medication is misused. The misuse of prescribed and illicit opioids contributes to rising numbers of opioid overdose deaths. This course will provide you with an overview of opioid use disorder, detailed information to gather during a comprehensive assessment, and treatment options to implement with clients diagnosed with opioid use disorder. 

List the primary symptoms of opioid use disorder and how they impact domains of functioning.

Summarize the primary biological and psychosocial factors involved in the etiology of opioid use disorder.

Identify information to include in an assessment for opioid use disorder.

Explain treatment options for opioid use disorder.

Instructor
Delia L. Lofton, MS, RT-R, CNMT

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The role of supervisor includes being a leader, a motivator, and a coach when guiding and directing others toward common goals. A supervisor’s success is enhanced with a proven set of characteristics, skills, and experiences that can help you effectively lead your organization, whether you are new to the role or have had some supervisory experience in the past. This course discusses specific skills, the qualities of good leadership, and approaches to enhance communication and time-management strategies to maximize your effectiveness as supervisor.

Describe approaches to enhance communication 

Integrate strategies to improve time management 

Identify qualities or good leaders, motivators, and coaches

Instructor
Debi Damas, RN
David Morstad, M.Ed.

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

The patient interview is the most important part of your exam. Gaining the patient’s perspective and learning more about issues important to them can guide you in developing patient-specific care plans. This course will discuss how to conduct patient-centered interviews. You will learn interviewing methods to effectively elicit the important details about a patient's reason for presenting to the clinic. Information will also be presented on how to approach a challenging patient and how to adapt for several specific patient types.

Recall four approaches to use to prepare for and begin an interview with a patient.

Explain four strategies for using patient-centered interviewing techniques.

Discuss eight important facets of a patient interview.

Recognize four types of challenging patients and techniques to use when interviewing each type.

Instructor
Lisa Hohlbein, RN, CDP

Staff Writer
Kimberly Cobb, M.S.

2.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This course will provide you with information about the numerous risk and protective factors of suicide. You will learn effective screening approaches you can use to identify elevated risk. You will also learn how to follow a positive screening with an in-depth clinical assessment, including several different models you can use to guide your assessment. The goal of this course is to provide alcohol and drug counseling, marriage and family therapy, counseling, psychology, and social work professionals in health and human services with skills to identify individuals at increased risk of suicide.

Recognize risk and protective factors for suicide.

Explain how to effectively screen to identify individuals at risk of suicide.

Summarize the major components of a comprehensive suicide assessment.

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

The biopsychosocial model takes a more holistic perspective, emphasizing biological, sociocultural, and psychological factors that relate to the risk of these disorders. This course will present an overview of this model’s primary assumptions, how it differs from other perspectives on substance-related and addictive behaviors, and how it can inform your approach to treatment. The goal of this course is to provide social workers, psychologists, alcohol and drug counselors, marriage and family therapists, professional counselors, and nurses in health and human services with information on how the biopsychosocial model is used in treatment for substance-related and addictive disorders.

Explain how substance-related and addictive disorders develop according to the primary assumptions of the biopsychosocial model.

State how the biopsychosocial model differs from other perspectives on substance-related and addictive disorders, such as the biomedical/ disease model.

Describe how the biopsychosocial model impacts treatment approaches for substance-related and addictive disorders.

Instructor
Bryn Davis, LPC, MAC

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Bronchoscopy is a valuable procedure with diagnostic and therapeutic benefits. However, it accompanies risks for potential complications, some of which can be life-threatening. In addition, patients commonly experience anxiety and stress before and during the procedure. In fact, some patients have even described it as traumatic. Nurses play an important role in preparing patients for a bronchoscopy both physically and mentally. 

Describe types of bronchoscopies performed along with the anatomy and conditions involved. Discuss potential complications and risks associated with bronchoscopy as well as preventive strategies. Identify nursing responsibilities and interventions before, during, and after a bronchoscopy.

Instructor
Paul Teelin, MSN, RN-BC

1.75

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This course examines the factors that may contribute to the underutilization of healthcare services, as well as ways to improve cultural understanding and competency in healthcare treatment. More specifically, this course covers the significance of cultural diversity, demographics, as well as individual and cultural diversity factors. The information in this training proposes some helpful conceptual frameworks for embracing cultural considerations in healthcare.

Explain how cultural differences can contribute to healthcare disparities.

Describe identities, affiliations, beliefs, and aspects of individual or group diversity that may contribute to the cultural identity of the person served.

Explain how cultural humility and improved cultural competency can positively affect healthcare services.

Instructor
Stephanie Furness, MSW, LCSW

Staff Writer
Katy Kunst, MBA, QIDP

0.75

Launch Course

Non-accredited Education

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

You can better assist your patients who have asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by building care teams in primary care. Learn how to assemble these teams and utilize certain disease-specific checkpoints for improved patient outcomes and health management.

Identify best practices for building care teams for patients with asthma and/or COPD.

Define key checkpoints and follow-ups with patients.

Cite different ways to evaluate the care provided by the team.

Instructor

Alisa Brewer, BSN, RN

0.75

Launch Course

Non-accredited Education

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Learn how to identify best practices for building care teams for patients with depression and anxiety, define key checkpoints and patient follow-ups, identify strategies for coordinating care with other providers, and evaluate the care provided by the team.

Identify best practices for building care teams for patients with depression and anxiety.

Define key checkpoints and follow-ups with patients.

Identify strategies for coordinating care with other providers.

Cite different ways to evaluate the care provided by the team.

Instructor

Adam Roesner, BSN

0.75

Launch Course

Non-accredited Education

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Diabetes, a very common chronic condition, can be managed by prescribing proper diet, exercise, and pharmaceutical treatments. This course discusses building care teams for these patients, teaching team members key milestones and checkpoints, ensuring medication adherence, and coordinating care with other providers as it relates to diabetes.

Implement best practices for building a care team of providers for patients with diabetes.

Teach all members of the care team the key milestones and necessary care checkpoints for patients with diabetes.

Coordinate care with other condition-relevant providers, and ensure medication adherence.

List evaluation strategies for care teams that manage diabetes.

Staff Writer
Adam Roesner, BSN

0.50

Launch Course

Non-accredited Education

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Identify checkpoints for managing and preventing the hospitalization of patients with hypertension (HTN), congestive heart failure (CHF), and coronary artery disease (CAD).

Identify best practices for building a care team of healthcare providers for patients with HTN, CHR, and CAD.

Define key check points and follow-up with patients.

Identify strategies for coordinating care with other providers.

Recognize different ways to evaluate the care provided by the care team.

Instructor
Alisa Brewer, BSN, RN

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

 The goal of this course is to provide knowledge about the clinical aspects of managing patients with BN.

Identify physical and emotional signs and symptoms of eating disorders, specifically bulimia nervosa.

Discuss the complications of bulimia nervosa.

Describe pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management strategies for patients with bulimia nervosa.

Instructor
Shana Jiang, PharmD, BCPS

Laura Bell, BSN, RN, CCRN

0.50

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Opioid dependence can be caused by the use of prescription opioids (obtained legally or illegally) or the use of illicit opioids (e.g., heroin). It continues to be a growing problem in the United States with opioid-related deaths occurring daily. Often, patients who discontinue opioid use require treatment to prevent relapse or the extreme effects of withdrawal. Buprenorphine is a partial mu-opioid agonist used for the treatment of patients with opioid dependence. It is available as a sublingual tablet, sublingual or buccal soluble film strip, and injection and is used in formulations with or without naloxone. The goal of this course is to educate nurses, pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians in acute care settings about opioid dependence and the therapeutic use of buprenorphine to treat the condition.

Describe the key differences among the three drugs approved for the treatment of opioid dependence.

Summarize the pharmacology, dosing, formulations, adverse effects, and interactions of buprenorphine.

Explain the regulations that govern the prescribing and dispensing of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence.

Instructor
Robert Smith, PharmD

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This course provides an overview of the autonomic nervous system and its functions, with a focus on the cardiac effects of certain therapeutic agents.

Recognize the difference between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Indicate the differences in receptors and their functions when attached to an agonist or antagonist.

Identify cardiac electrophysiology and general classes for the treatment of arrhythmias.

Instructor
Robert Smith, PharmD

Staff Writer
Kimberly Workman, MA

 

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

The healthcare system is becoming increasingly complex. Therefore, care coordination and case management (CM) are integral to producing optimal member outcomes, decreasing the cost of care, and ensuring effective use of healthcare services. In this course, you will learn about the function, need, goals, and principles of care coordination and CM within the payor setting as well as common challenges that may be encountered. Finally, you will learn about the care coordination and CM process and the benefits to providers, members, and payer organizations.

The goal of this course is to equip nurses and CM professionals with education about the functions and benefits of the care coordination and CM process.

Summarize two key functions and benefits of care coordination and case management in the payer setting. Describe how effective care coordination and case management surpass clinical perspectives to facilitate more encompassing healthcare improvement. Describe two key components involved in the care coordination and case management process.

Instructor
Cathryn Ayers, RN

1.25

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

As they age, many patients find themselves developing one or more chronic diseases, but they don’t know how to navigate this country’s fragmented and exorbitantly expensive healthcare system in order to receive appropriate care. Care coordination by the medical team—providing additional services such as education and close monitoring of the disease process—has been shown to decrease healthcare costs while improving patients’ health. Unfortunately, standardized techniques or processes for care coordination are not in place. This course for nurses discusses care coordination’s process, its various components, current efforts, ideas for improvement, and a review of practical applications for your nursing practice.

Describe care coordination and reasons why it is important for patients and providers.

Recall three strategies for care coordination.

Explain the six components of care coordination.

Discuss six steps for initiating a coordinated care effort.

Staff Writer
Kimberly Cobb, M.S.

Instructor
Jennifer W. Burks, R.N., M.S.N.

Expert Reviewer
Stephanie Furness, MSW, LCSW

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

This course provides detailed information about the pathophysiology, disease trajectory, and unique symptoms experienced by patients with advanced neurological diseases. Learners will identify the clinical features of advanced Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease as well as best practices for symptom management. In addition, the key clinical indicators and symptoms that should serve as triggers to optimally transition a patient with advanced neurological diseases to palliative and hospice care are presented. The unique disease-related stressors for family caregivers are discussed. The goal of this course is to provide nurses in hospice with knowledge of caring for people with end-stage neurological diseases.

Identify specific patterns of progression for three neurological disorders.

Identify five complications related to neurological disorders, including disease-related stressors for family caregivers.

Describe interventions related to end-stage neurological diseases.

Identify triggers to optimally transition a patient with advanced neurological disease to palliative care and hospice.

Instructor
Susan Heinzerling, BSN, RN, CHPN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that about 50 percent of American adults have at least one chronic condition. Today's primary care providers have the ability to better manage this population by utilizing care management. This course discusses use of the care management model in the ambulatory care setting to increase patients' access to providers and decrease hospital visits, including readmission. It also addresses the issue of some payment systems not allowing providers to profit from managing chronic conditions.

Define care management and how it relates to ambulatory care.

State ways that care management increases access to healthcare providers.

Discuss how care management decreases hospital readmissions.

Identify strategies for creating a successful care management program.

Instructor
Elizabeth Kellerman, MSN, RN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

This course explains the indications for hysterectomy, a commonly performed surgical procedure. You will learn the different approaches and the areas of special learning needs for women experiencing this procedure. Also covered is post-operative nursing care for women who undergo a hysterectomy, whether that care takes place in a surgery center, a hospital, or at home.

List three indications for a hysterectomy

Identify three areas of special learning needs for women experiencing a hysterectomy

Outline the nursing care in the surgery center or hospital and at home for women who undergo a hysterectomy

Instructor
Kathleen Cross, MSN, RNC-OB, LCCE

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Cervical cancer continues to affect thousands of women, but increases in routine screening for women ages 21 to 65 have resulted in a steady decrease in the number of diagnosed cases over the past decade. This course discusses the basics of etiology, risk factors, screening methods, diagnosis and staging, and subsequent treatment of cervical cancer. 

Identify at least three risk factors for cervical cancer.

Describe the classification of cervical dysplasia.

Appraise current treatment modalities for cervical dysplasia depending on unique cytology results.

Instructor
Jennifer Stephens, PhD, MA, RN, OCN

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The U.S. is one of just eight countries to see a rise in maternal mortality during the past decade, with a ranking of 60 out of 180 countries for maternal deaths. High-risk pregnancies with mothers who are surviving childhood conditions into adulthood are among the reasons for the high rate; however, a large proportion of maternal deaths are still considered preventable, indicating that further improvement is possible. This course provides comprehensive knowledge about medical conditions the pregnant woman might face and how access to other disciplines such as cardiology, dermatology and rheumatology may improve the health and outcomes for the mother and fetus.

Discuss current medical management and nursing implications of heart disease in pregnancy

Explain the criteria for using insulin to manage diabetes during pregnancy

Describe two potential complications that may occur in a pregnant woman with congenital heart disease

Compare the effects of pregnancy-induced hypertension and diabetic nephropathy on the management of pregnancy, labor and delivery

Recognize the assessment findings in a patient with sickle-cell disease complicating pregnancy

Describe at least one way in which thyroid disease complicates pregnancy

Explain how autoimmune disorders complicate pregnancy

Identify three goals of the antepartum management of clients with chronic medical conditions

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

Expert Reviewer
Steve Jenkins, PhD
David Patzer, MD
 

0.75

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Three different obstetrical scenarios, complicated by a Category II Fetal Heart Rate pattern, are presented to illustrate the importance of clinical context when formulating management plans. Emphasis, characteristics, and potential etiologies of Category II fetal heart rate tracings are reviewed. Management of the patient with a Category II fetal heart rate pattern is discussed, with special emphasis on the importance of the clinical context and fetal heart rate pattern evolution.

Describe characteristics of Category II FHR tracings.

Identify common etiologies for Category II FHR tracings during labor.

Examine clinical interventions for Category II FHR tracings.

Review the etiology-based management of Category II FHR tracings.

Expert Reviewer
William Cusick, MD, MFM, FACOG
Dr. Patricia Hensley, DNP, MHA, BSN, RNC-OB
Catherine McGovern, MSN, WHNP-BC, CNM, IBCLC, RN

0.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) workgroup standard for fetal heart rate monitoring assessment and categorization, first proposed in 1997 and subsequently updated in 2008 was meant to promote commonality of FHR tracing nomenclature and interpretation. Based on these recommendations, a three-tiered categorization pattern based on the visual assessment of the fetal heart rate pattern was adopted. This module aims to review and apply essential FHR content in several clinical scenarios to highlight an important Clinical Pearl: The Category III tracing is a rare intrapartum FHR pattern that is highly associated with fetal acidemia and adverse neonatal outcomes.

Consistently apply 1997 and 2008 NICHD definitions and terminology when describing intrapartum fetal heart rate patterns.

Identify intrapartum fetal heart rate tracings using the 2008 NICHD 3-tiered system.

Recognize the fetal heart rate characteristics that define a Category III pattern.

Review the diagnostic imprecision and clinical significance of minimal fetal heart rate variability.

Expert Reviewer
William Cusick, MD, MFM, FACOG
Dr. Patricia Hensley, DNP, MHA, BSN, RNC-OB
Catherine McGovern, MSN, WHNP-BC, CNM, IBCLC, RN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in the U.S. and worldwide. However, if the condition is well managed, it can result in a healthy pregnancy. Maternal child health professionals must understand the condition, risk factors, and how to treat it.

Identify the pathophysiology of and risk factors for developing gestational diabetes mellitus.

Identify lab tests and values that guide the diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus.

Discuss monitoring and treatment of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

Instructor
Lauren Manaker, MS, RD, LD, CLEC

Staff Writer
Kimberly Workman, MA

 

0.50

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

A case of obstetrical hemorrhage due to uterine atony, requiring medical and surgical interventions and blood component replacement therapy is presented. Emphasis: A review of obstetrical hemorrhage, etiologies, and treatments is provided. The importance of early recognition and response to excessive blood loss is stressed. Medical and surgical interventions for uterine atony are reviewed. Current recommendations for blood component replacement therapy for massive hemorrhage are discussed.

List common risk factors for OH.

Review medical treatments for uterine atony.

Identify pre-surgical and surgical treatments for uterine atony.

Describe blood component therapy for massive hemorrhage.

Expert Reviewer
William Cusick, MD, MFM, FACOG
Dr. Patricia Hensley, DNP, MHA, BSN, RNC-OB
Susan Hale, DNP, RNC-OB, C-EFM

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Dementia gradually destroys the areas of the brain responsible for sending and receiving messages, making communication difficult. There are guidelines that you can follow to ensure effective communication with persons with dementia, even those who have severe cognitive impairments. In this course, you will learn how to understand the person with dementia by knowing them as an individual and recognizing common speech patterns, how persons with dementia use behaviors for communicating discomfort, and the communication strategies you can employ to ensure the person receives your message.

Give two examples of common communication changes people with dementia exhibit.

Describe how knowing the person with dementia as an individual, not as a disease, promotes effective communication.

Describe the techniques for communicating more effectively with people with dementia.

Instructor
Kim Matthews, RN

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

In this course, you will learn the essential telehealth components necessary to conduct a clinical assessment, risk assessment, and utilize formal assessment instruments. You will also learn what hardware and software technological resources are needed to connect with clients via telehealth.

The goal of this course is to provide addictions, behavioral health counseling, marriage and family therapy, psychology, and social work professionals in health and human services with information on conducting clinical assessments via telehealth.

Identify at least three essential components of the intake process and best practices, methodology, and frequency of completing risk assessments via telehealth.

Determine the benefits and limitations of using clinical assessment tools for telehealth services.

Recognize software and hardware requirements for assessing clients remotely.

Instructor
Bryn Davis, LPC, MAC

0.50

Launch Course

Non-accredited Education

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Conflict in the workplace is inevitable, because every person is different. However, handling it the right way leads to better relationships, an improved work environment, a stronger team, and personal goal achievement. This course presents techniques essential to handling conflict in the workplace.

Identify different types of conflict. Explain how to handle conflict appropriately. Describe strategies for dealing with difficult people appropriately.

Instructor
Isla C. Miller

Expert Reviewer
Justin Hess, MS

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Recognizing, understanding, and addressing patient behaviors, as well as the rationales behind these behaviors, is critical to successfully manage patients and protect practitioners and their practices. This course will review three major areas complicating patient care: Drug diversion, SUD, and pain management considerations in patients with SUD.

The goal of this course is to equip nurses, social workers, counselors, and physicians in both acute and post-acute care with how to prevent, identify, and manage substance abuse among residents and/or patients.

Define drug diversion and identify various classifications of medications that are diverted or abused.

Recognize rationales for prescription drug diversion.

Recognize and prevent drug diversion behaviors and activities.

Identify tools to detect and deter drug diversion. Define key terms necessary to understand SUD.

Name common controlled and noncontrolled medications that are abused.

Describe screening and assessment tools helpful in identifying SUD.

Describe the nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments of SUD.

Define specific types of pain.

Identify options for pain management using the most recent CDC guidelines.

Instructor
Doug Raiff, PharmD, BCPS

Johnny J. Bethea, II, BSPharm

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

 After completing this refresher course on the key action steps in CPR, you will have a grasp on the essential components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including the initial first aid steps you can take prior to performing CPR. Through didactic, interactive exercises and vignettes, you will be able to apply this material when you need it most. This course does not replace formalized training and return demonstration that must be completed for competency according to the American Heart Association. This course should only be used as a “refresher” to remind the learner of the key action steps in CPR.

Define the importance of timeliness in performing CPR.

Describe the signs and symptoms of a person in need of CPR.

Review the correct procedure for performing CPR correctly.

Instructor
Amy M. Johnson MSN, RN, CPN

1.50

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The OR is a complex environment. Highly trained individuals interact in a specialized setting with sophisticated and technically complicated devices, instruments, and equipment. There also are substantial differences among team members related to education, experience, skill level, influence, and formal and informal power. This module will inform nurses and surgical technologists of the evidence-based steps to take to create a culture of safety in the OR.

Describe communication processes that relate to reducing medical errors

Discuss the components of a just culture that promote trust and accountability

Review recommendations for the safe transfer of patient care information

Discuss a 10-step process for creating a culture of safety in the OR

Name organizations that are helping to create a culture of patient safety

Instructor
Patricia Seifert, RN, MSN, CNOR, CRNFA, FAAN

Expert Reviewer
Mary E. McNaron, RN, CST, CNOR, MSN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Crisis is broadly defined as an exceptional event that is disruptive and beyond a person‘s usual coping skills. The goal of crisis intervention is to return individuals or families to the optimum level of functioning they experienced before the crisis. In addition, a potential for growth exists when people develop new and effective coping skills. Nurses need to understand crises and assessment and intervention strategies because they are often the first medical personnel to spend enough time with patients to recognize the signs of crisis.

Identify types and phases of crises

Describe comorbidities and other limiting factors that affect crisis outcomes

Discuss assessment strategies and intervention techniques for crisis management

Instructor
Connie Vogel, PhD, RN, CNS-BC, CNE

0.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Life-threatening dysrhythmias can occur in an inpatient setting, even more so in an intensive care unit. Changes to the electrical conduction system can cause sudden hemodynamic instability and cardiac death. Given this, critical care nurses must understand the different types of dysrhythmias, their causes, ECG characteristics, defibrillation, pacing, and nursing interventions.

Describe at least three lethal dysrhythmias commonly encountered in the critical care setting.

Identify the etiology, clinical presentation, and management of some of the lethal dysrhythmias.

Staff Writer
Zeliha Ozen, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNL

0.75

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Therapeutic communication between the nurse, patient, and family can be challenging in high-stress environments. Typically, critical care units have higher acuity levels and intense time constraints, thus hindering effective interactions. However, nurses who receive education in communication methods are more prepared to effectively communicate with their patients and families. Given this, critical care nurses must understand communication barriers, cultural influences, the importance of patient-centered communication, and strategies to increase therapeutic interactions. 

Describe three therapeutic communication techniques and strategies to address the needs of patients in the critical care setting.

Describe patient and family-centered communication, cultural differences, and communication barriers inherent to the critical care environment.

Staff Writer
Zeliha Ozen, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNL

0.75

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Sepsis is the result of a dysregulated host response to severe infection that can result in systemic inflammation, immune system dysfunction, coagulopathies, multi-organ system failure, and death (Rhodes et al., 2017). The signs and symptoms of sepsis can vary in onset and presentation and depend on many individual patient factors. Early recognition and intervention is key to improving patient outcomes. Nurses are vital in this role as they are readily at the bedside and able to continually assess the patient and communicate changes in patient condition to providers. The goal of this course is to challenge the learner’s ability to identify key risk factors for sepsis and recognize signs and symptoms of early and progressive sepsis. It will also challenge the learner to accurately anticipate management strategies in the treatment of sepsis and sepsis-related complications.

Identify key risk factors for sepsis.

Recognize the signs and symptoms for early and progressive sepsis.

Identify management strategies and in the treatment of sepsis and potential sepsis-related complications.

Instructor
Laura Bell, BSN, RN, CCRN

0.50

Launch Course

Non-accredited Education

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

This introductory overview of cultural diversity will help enable you to interact with others of diverse cultures and effectively perform your job responsibilities.

Explain the importance of understanding a person's culture when providing services.

Examine common issues in cultural diversity.

Identify appropriate responses to cultures that differ from your own.

Benjamin Reese, Jr., Psy.D.

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This course will examine the reasons for healthcare disparities among ethnic and racial minorities, the ways in which both the cultural backgrounds of patients and their clinicians can negatively impact patients’ mental health outcomes, and what kinds of actions clinicians can take to provide more effective care to patients of diverse cultures. The goal of this continuing education program is to familiarize nurses, physician, and social workers with the issues in and strategies for providing effective care to mental health patients of diverse cultures.

Distinguish between some of the different assumptions and values that mental health providers and clients hold, which influence their approaches to mental health.

Select assessment and intervention strategies that promote culturally competent care.

Explain why patients of diverse cultures with mental health needs are encountering disparities.

Distinguish between some of the different assumptions and values that mental health providers and patients hold, which influence their approaches to mental health.

Instructor
Rebecca Smallwood, MBA, RN

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The Joint Commission's standards for culturally competent patient-centered care went into effect for hospitals in January 2011, and began affecting accreditation decisions in 2012. In today‘s multicultural healthcare environment, caregivers cannot make assumptions about patients‘ behaviors based on their own cultural backgrounds. This continuing education module helps healthcare professionals understand the impact of culture on women‘s health beliefs and practices, and their responses to current approaches to care.

Describe cultural influences on women’s health beliefs and practices

Discuss how to work appropriately within the framework of cultural beliefs that may impact acceptance of or adherence to common preventive care recommendations

Develop culturally sensitive patient education and care

Instructor
Kirtley Ceballos, MSN, RNC-NIC, PCNS-BC
Laura McKay, DNP, CNM, FNP-BC
 

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Individual social, spiritual and physiological factors seem to influence the experience of pain. People experience pain differently even within the same cultural group by having more or less of a modulating substance, such as endorphins, within their physiological system. This could explain why the response to pain differs not only among people from different backgrounds but among those from the same ethnic group. There is also evidence that primary care providers underestimate pain severity in their minority patients. This continuing education module helps healthcare professionals become familiar with cultural differences associated with pain perceptions and pain management.

Describe how culture can influence a patient’s perception and expression of pain

Determine how cultural background affects a healthcare professional’s response to and management of pain

Relate strategies for reducing unintentional bias in pain assessment and promoting management decisions to respond to a patient’s pain in a culturally sensitive manner

Instructor
Claudia M Campbell, PhD Psychology

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

Healthcare professionals must go beyond simply recognizing that there are different cultural norms and practices. Culturally appropriate interventions must be utilized when working with culturally diverse clients and patients. Cultural competency goes beyond having knowledge of traditional cultural eating patterns. A lack of cultural competency creates divisions between healthcare professionals and their clients or patients. This course discusses how cultural competency functions to deliver culturally competent care related to diet and nutrition.

Explain the importance of integrating cultural competence into individual and organizational practice.

Identify culturally competent strategies and incorporate them into practice.

Apply knowledge of traditional cultural diets into effective patient teaching.

Staff Writer
Stephanie M. Smith MS, BSN, RN, CPN

Expert Reviewer
Julie Stefanski, MEd, RDN, CSSD, LDN, CDCES, FAND

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

As the population of the U.S. soars in diversity, healthcare professionals must be prepared to care for childbearing families from many cultures. All cultures and families need to be given the same respect; be assured of the highest quality of care; have their religious, ethnic, and cultural values respected and integrated into their care; and have their physical and educational needs met in a way that respects spiritual beliefs and individuality. Knowledge of cultures and the influence they have on women’s perceptions of childbirth are important for achieving positive outcomes. 

The goal of this continuing education course is to improve the ability of healthcare providers to assess and meet the sociocultural needs of childbearing families of diverse cultural and social groups.

Discuss the relationship of culture, subculture, acculturation, assimilation, ethnocentrism, and cultural relativism to healthcare practice 

Recognize a variety of ethnic and cultural beliefs and practices related to childbearing and family 

Identify needs unique to culturally diverse families who adhere to traditional beliefs and practices regarding childbearing.

Instructor
Rebecca Smallwood, MBA, RN

1.50

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

This training introduces you to several models to enhance your communication with individuals from a range of diverse backgrounds. You will also learn about cultural barriers to treatment, several health belief systems, and factors to consider in a culturally responsive assessment. It is worth noting that culture is always at play, regardless of the healthcare provider’s capacity to recognize and/or respond to it appropriately.

Summarize how to use three culturally competent assessment frameworks to enhance communication and engagement.

Explain at least two approaches you can use to improve the cultural sensitivity of your assessment process.

State options for helping individuals of culturally diverse groups overcome barriers to treatment.

Describe the four major health belief systems.

Staff Writer
Katy Kunst, MBA, QIDP

Instructor
Stephanie Furness, MSW, LCSW

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

Employee Cyber Security Awareness Training is more important now than it has ever been. Data breaches and hacking may sound unlikely, but cyber-attacks occur daily. In many cases, businesses are unprepared, because management does not understand the risk. Many companies believe they will not be the target of an attack. The truth is that all companies must prepare for a cyber-attack by having an individual or team in place to protect from such an attack.

Provide an overview of the risk associated with cybercrime.

Understand risk of computer malware and how to protect your organization.

Understand cyber threats and ways to protect against these crimes.

Understand social engineering methods and day-to-day security practices.

Understand how passwords may be exploited and how to maximize password security.

Learn how to recognize the threat of social engineering.

Understand how to safely handle email phishing scams.

Learn how to recognize computer viruses, spyware, keyloggers, and other malicious code.

Expert Reviewer
Michael Levin

1.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

The goal of this course is to provide education to entry-level professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, alcohol and drug counselors, psychologists, nurses, and social workers working in the health and human services field about types, prevalence, causes, and consequences of medical and treatment errors in the behavioral health setting, as well as how to address them and reduce risk of future errors.

Discuss types and prevalence of medical and treatment errors in behavioral health.

Describe causes and consequences of medical and treatment errors.

Identify strategies to address an error and reduce the risk of future errors.

Staff Writer
Jennifer Niles, MSW, LCSW, LCAS

Instructor
Cecelia Garritt, RN, BAS, BSN, MPH

 

 

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Suicide is the 17th leading cause of death worldwide and the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Early detection, assessment, and effective intervention are vital in caring for patients with medical illnesses who may also be suffering from depression. Patients with medical illness are at risk for depression, and depression may be complicating treatment and the ability to recuperate effectively. Underdiagnosed and undertreated depression may be taking an enormous toll on the resources of both the patient and the family. This course will teach healthcare professionals what makes a patient vulnerable to suicide, recognize and treat depression, and components of treatment plan.

Describe the association between chronic medical conditions and the risk of depression and suicide.

List three factors that make patients vulnerable to suicide.

Differentiate among suicide attempts, gestures, threats, and ideation.

Distinguish between mood and affect as they relate to the assessment for depression.

List two core symptoms of major depression.

Identify the difference between mood changes due to grief and those due to depression.

Describe the clinician’s role in supporting patients with depression.

Describe the ability of healthcare professionals to recognize and treat depression.

Explain the function of psychotherapy in the treatment of depression.

Identify one method healthcare professionals may use to examine personal attitudes about the stigma of depression and suicide.

Describe two patient self-care treatment plan components.

Identify two family education and support needs regarding depression.

Instructor
Connie Vogel, PhD, RN, CNS-BC, CNE

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Diabetes is not an uncommon condition in today’s healthcare systemthe U.S.. This high-volume condition can be managed very effectively, but diabetes disease management can also become very complicated. How can patients learn to manage their own diabetes? What strategies are most effective in teaching patient self-care? By creating an action plan with their patients, primary care providers can not only help to improve patient outcomes, but they can also empower the patients to take a bigger role in their own their disease management. When patients take on more responsibility for their care, resources (both time and economic) are freed up and can be allocated to other patients or areas of need. However, creating an action plan requires input from both the primary care provider and the patient, and no two plans are likely to be the same. Factors such as finances, living situation, or other social determinants of health must all must be considered when putting together a plan. A patient’s diet may also play a role. In this module, the topics of action plans, the social determinants of health, and nutritional counseling will be explored.

The goal of this course is to provide case/care management, nursing, and social work professionals with information about diabetes management.

Identify challenges to the successful and cost-effective management of diabetes for patients and providers.

Differentiate the components of a diabetes action plan and the information it provides.

Select ways healthcare professionals can help patients become more comfortable with and adept at self-management of diabetes.

Instructor
Carrie Furberg, BSN, RN, CRN

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Anxiety disorders, the most common psychiatric illnesses, affect millions of American adults, filling their lives with overwhelming anxiety, fear, and uncertainty out of proportion to any actual danger. These symptoms often persist for significant periods of time, and if not treated, can grow progressively worse. Anxiety disorders frequently occur in conjunction with other psychiatric or physical illnesses, making symptoms even worse. This course provides an overview of signs and symptoms as well as the most effective psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments available. New and improved therapies can help most people with anxiety disorders lead productive, fulfilling lives. This course will help you recognize anxiety disorders in those you serve and implement the most appropriate form of treatment.

Identify the signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders.

List three common psychopharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders.

Explain three of the psychotherapeutic interventions for anxiety disorders.

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

2.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

As a behavioral health professional, you know how challenging it can be to understand the complexities of diagnosing and treating personality disorders. Drawing upon guidelines from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and current empirical literature, this course offers you a comprehensive look at the etiology, categories, and diagnostic criteria for personality disorders while considering differential diagnoses and co-occurring disorders. Lastly, this course offers information on best practices for the treatment of personality disorders.

Describe the essential characteristics of all 10 personality disorders according to the DSM-5.

Discuss reasons for an alternative model for diagnosing personality disorders.

Explain 2 factors related to the etiology of personality disorders.

Identify at least 3 disorders that commonly co-occur or overlap with personality disorders.

List up to 5 best practice approaches for treating specific personality disorders.

Instructor
Stephanie L. Furness, MSW, LCSW

1.75

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

The two most common trauma-related disorders are acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The goal of this educational program is to provide nurses, social workers, marriage and family therapists, professional counselors, and psychologists in health and human services settings with information on the diagnostic criteria for acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder, steps in the diagnostic process, and psychological and pharmacological interventions to treat PTSD.

Recognize the diagnostic criteria for acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder and how to differentiate between them.

Identify at least 4 risk factors for and 4 protective factors against the development of PTSD.

Discuss the 3 steps of the diagnostic process.

Recall 9 recommended treatment approaches for PTSD.

Instructor
Stephanie L. Furness, MSW, LCSW

Staff Writer
Kimberly Cobb, M.S.

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Discussing end-of-life issues is not easy, because few of us are ready to face the difficult choices surrounding death and dying. Regardless of whether or not we acknowledge it, most of us fear death. This course will take you on the journey of facing issues surrounding death and dying. The decisions to be made are difficult for everyone involved: the dying person, their family and loved ones, and the healthcare professionals sharing the experience. Each person and family will have unique needs and cope in different ways. For many patients and their families, this can also be a time of personal growth. These events often provide people with the opportunity to find out more about themselves and appreciate what is most important to them.

Describe the communication process at the end of life.

Identify the ethical issues surrounding end-of-life decisions.

Identify the physical process of dying.

Discuss loss, grief, and bereavement.

Describe the goals of palliative care.

Describe pain and symptoms common at end of life.

Instructor
Susan Heinzerling, RN, CHPN

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Ensuring that a healthcare system is culturally competent can reduce health disparities. Healthcare employees who have effective interpersonal and working relationships are essential to successful healthcare outcomes. Healthcare staff provide care to individuals from many backgrounds, so it is essential that they get proper Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) training. DEI training should be integrated into the standard hiring and onboarding process for the entire healthcare workforce. The goal of this course is to provide healthcare employees with training about Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI).

Define cultural competence, implicit bias, and indirect discrimination.

Describe at least two assumptions and myths related to stereotypes.

Explain best practices when working with people from different races, cultures, values, and sexual orientations.

List at least three barriers to providing quality healthcare.

Identify at least two ways to make the healthcare environment welcoming for all people. 

Instructor
Juan Armando Rojas Joo, Ph.D.

Staff Writer
Kimberly Workman, MA

2.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

A critical step for service providers in receiving reimbursement is to submit treatment-planning documentation. This course reinforces what you already know about plans of care, while offering suggestions for capturing the real therapeutic relationship on paper. You will learn how to hone in on core principles for clinical documentation; take a fresh look at ways to record your client’s strengths, goals, and treatment objectives; and evaluate methods of accurately representing interventions, outcomes, and discharge plans.

Identify the preferences and needs of various stakeholders in the treatment planning process, most importantly the client.

Summarize seven core principles of effective treatment planning documentation.

Identify at least three effective ways to document client strengths and barriers to treatment during the planning process.

Describe how to develop measurable and client-focused goals and objectives for treatment planning.

Explain how to document planned interventions, desired outcomes, and treatment changes that occur based on client progress.

Instructor
Monique Kahn, Psy.D.

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

This course will familiarize the learner with basic information concerning domestic and intimate partner violence (IPV). Information about IPV’s prevalence, characteristics, legal protections and risk factors will be presented. The cycle of abuse will be explained along with issues related intimate partner homicide. Screening and intervention protocols will be described along with community resources available to people experiencing domestic and intimate partner violence.

Define domestic and intimate partner violence (IPV).

Describe the extent of domestic violence in California and the United States and recognize legal protections.

Recognize characteristics of both victims and perpetrators of IPV. Identify red flags and risk factors for IPV.

Define the cycle of abuse and list reasons victims may stay in an abusive relationship.

Describe risk factors for intimate partner homicide, including guns and strangulation.

Describe screening measures used to identify persons who have experienced IPV.

List community resources available to assist victims and their families.

Instructor
Catherine Zimmerman, LICSW, ACHP-SW, CSW-G
Cynthia McDaniel, MSN, RN

2.00

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Nurses encounter victims of domestic violence or intimate partner violence regardless of where they work. Those who practice in offices, hospitals, clinics, homes, or facilities must be aware that living with domestic violence may be part of a person’s daily life. Even though education for healthcare professionals and routine screening in EDs is mandated, many abused people do not receive needed support. Nurses are able to recognize and help victims, yet do not necessarily receive education about domestic violence. This updated CE module provides information nurses need to increase their understanding of and provide support to people experiencing domestic and intimate partner violence.

Disclaimer: Images in this course depict violence that has been inflicted on children and adults. They may be disturbing to some learners.

List steps ensuring the safety of abused women who decide to leave an abusive environment Identify the role of intimate partner advocacy in helping victims or survivors to understand that physical, sexual, or emotional abuse is not their fault but an issue of power and control. Relate direct and indirect questions that broach the subject of violence and abuse with patients, partners, and family members to screen for abuse. Identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms associated with abuse and neglect across the lifespan.

Staff Writer
Cathryn Ayers, RN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

The goal of this course is to help nurses and speech-language pathologists (SLP) in early identification of dysphagia after a stroke. This course will review the incidence of dysphagia in stroke and the types of screenings and exams used for early detection and diagnosis. After reviewing swallow screens in detail, you will be able to understand how each member of the interprofessional team plays a role in the implementation of these assessments.

Determine the outcomes of patients with acute stroke who experience dysphagia.

Identify the screening methods and exams used to assess dysphagia.

Recognize the role of the interprofessional team in improving dysphagia outcomes.

Instructor
Amy Bonadies, RN, BSN

0.50

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

Economic stability is defined as a domain of social determinants of health in the Healthy People 2030 campaign. In this course, you will learn how economic stability relates to an individual’s ability to access resources, such as food, adequate housing, and healthcare. Income and health are strongly, positively correlated (Khullar & Chockshi, 2018). Each of the components of economic stability, which include poverty, employment, food security, and housing stability, are linked to individual health outcomes.

Describe the four components of economic stability.

Explain how economic stability affects health and health outcomes.

Describe strategies for helping patients overcome barriers to economic stability and how they positively impact health outcomes.

Instructor
Stephanie M. Smith MS, BSN, RN, CPN

0.25

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

In today’s workplace, the abundance of “noise,” such as technology, multitasking, stress, and information overload, can make it hard to communicate effectively, ultimately costing time and money. But by learning how to communicate clearly, concisely, and professionally, you’ll increase understanding with your coworkers. This course identifies primary verbal and nonverbal cues, explains active-listening techniques, and suggests how to avoid barriers to good communication.

Engage in key elements of communication.

Identify primary verbal and nonverbal communication cues.

Employ active-listening techniques.

Instructor
Susan Fee, M.Ed., LPCC

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

This nursing leadership module educates nurses about trends in the healthcare industry, discusses skills nurses can learn to influence change, and challenges every nurse to become a strong leader and a supportive team member.

Define change strategies and how resistance to change can be anticipated and managed.

Identify leadership skills that will help nurses positively influence change in healthcare organizations.

Recall characteristics of effective leaders and supportive followers.

Instructor
Elizabeth Kellerman, MSN, RN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

In an emergency department, information often flows amongst providers and patients quickly because of urgent, sometimes life-threatening, situations. Due to the volume of information being shared, as well as the need for it to be shared quickly and accurately, emergency department providers must be especially careful to safeguard patient information.

The goal of this course is to update nursing professionals in the acute care setting with basic information about the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and 42 CFR Part 2.

Identify information sharing standards under HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2.

Define the concept of consent, when you must obtain it to share or receive information, and the types of information that may not be available to you.

Instructor
Amanda C Richards, MA, LPCC, LADC, MAC

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Expiration:

As a healthcare professional transporting patients to the ED, you may serve patients with symptoms indicative of behavioral health disorders, such as depressive, bipolar, and anxiety disorders. In some situations, the ED provider must administer psychiatric medications. However, if possible, it is prudent to defer their use until the patient is admitted to an inpatient mental health facility or seen as an outpatient. In many instances, the reason for presentation in the ED is an adverse reaction to psychiatric medications.

Discuss some of the most common medications in each major category, their indications, as well as their usage in the treatment of mental health disorders.

Recall adverse reactions to psychiatric medications.

Staff Writers
Johnny J. Bethea, II, BSPharm
Zeliha Ozen, MSN, RN, CCRN, CN